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Longitudinal Tooth Contact Pattern Shift - May 2012

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Archive > 2012 > May 2012 > Longitudinal Tooth Contact Pattern Shift

The article "Longitudinal Tooth Contact Pattern Shift" appeared in the May 2012 issue of Gear Technology.

Summary
After a period of operation, high-speed turbo gears may exhibit a change in longitudinal tooth contact pattern, reducing full face width contact and thereby increasing risk of tooth distress due to the decreased loaded area of the teeth. But this can be tricky—the phenomenon may or may not occur. Or, in some units the shift is more severe than others, with documented cases in which shifting occurred after as little as 16,000 hours of operation. In other cases, there is no evidence of any change for units in operation for more than 170,000 hours. This condition exists primarily in helical gears. All recorded observations here have been with case-carburized and ground gear sets. This presentation describes phenomena observed in a limited sampling of the countless high-speed gear units in field operation. While the authors found no existing literature describing this behavior, further investigation suggests a possible cause. Left unchecked and without corrective action, this occurrence may result in tooth breakage.

Keywords
helical gears, tooth contact pattern, contact pattern

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