Posts From Charles D. Schultz

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Gear Talk With Chuck

The Right Stuff

Even the most brilliant gear design will fail if the wrong material is used to make the parts. Our understanding of metallurgy and alloying elements has continued to evolve, so

Gear Talk With Chuck

Further Modifications

You might be thinking this conversation would logically move to other tooth modifications. Gear Technology has and will continue to publish many fine, scholarly papers on micro-geometry, and I encourage

Gear Talk With Chuck

Parametric Design

One of the scariest things a gear designer can face is a blank sheet of paper. This is why most of our products are “derivative” rather than “revolutionary.” I am

Gear Talk With Chuck

Computer Games

You kids are spoiled! Back in my day it took at least a day to see the results of computer modeling, longer if the courier dropped the box of input

Gear Talk With Chuck

What’s Your Angle?

Hulet self-unloader image courtesy of ASME. Interesting things happen when you start using “non-standard” gear geometry. As early as the 1880s, engineers understood that tooth shape and root fillet geometry

Gear Talk With Chuck

Making Things Work

There is an old saying that if the only tool you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. Imagine that you are tasked by your employer to design

Gear Talk With Chuck

That X Factor

Our international readers are no doubt chuckling over this silly, American “long addendum” terminology. The “civilized world” has long relied on a more precise concept of “rack offset coefficient” to

Gear Talk With Chuck

Bending the Rules

In my last posting I advised designers to avoid relying on “rules of thumb” or computer coding when confronted with tough decisions. This admonition has its roots in one of

Gear Talk With Chuck

Actions Have Consequences

The initial motivation for changing outside diameters was the avoidance of undercutting. Designers, engineers, and theoreticians quickly discovered that the practice had other advantages — plus a few problems. On

Gear Talk With Chuck

The Long and Short of It

One of the problems with “tribal knowledge” is that the terminology can confuse those who are not fully immersed in that community. I have lost count of the number of