Home | Advertise | Subscribe

Magazine | Newsletter | Product Alerts | Blog

September/October 2001

Archive > 2001 > September/October 2001

Download the September/October 2001 Issue in PDF format

Feature Articles

Gear Education at Gear Expo
Gear Expo provides an opportunity to learn from the industry's experts by walking the aisles and talking to exhibitors. Visitors to Gear Expo 2001 also can take advantage of some formal training and educational opportunities sponsored by AGMA and SME.

Gear Expo Trivia Challenge
You've attended Gear Expo so many times that you think you're an expert on it. Test your expertise with this quiz.

Detroit Trivia Challenge
You've been to Detroit several times for Gear Expo, so you think you know Motown pretty well. Prove it. Gear Technology has a quiz to test your knowledge of the Motor City.

The "Unofficial Guide" to Gear Expo 2001
We've contacted many of the companies that will be exhibiting at Gear Expo 2001 to compile the following directory of exhibits. Use this directory to help plan your visit to the show, or to stay up-to-date on the industry's suppliers and technology.

Museums, Casinos and Motown: The Detroit Outside Cobo Center
Besides Gear Expo 2001, Detroit is home to a museum with an 1896 Durya Motor Wagon, America's first production car; home to a casino in a building that use to be Internal Revenue Service offices; and home to the studio where Diana Ross and the Supremes recorded "Stop in the Name of Love."

Technical Articles

What "Ease-Off" shows about Bevel and Hypoid Gears
The configuration of flank corrections on bevel gears is subject to relatively narrow restrictions. As far as the gear set is concerned, the requirement is for the greatest possible contact zone to minimize flank compression. However, sufficient reserves in tooth depth and longitudinal direction for tooth contact displacement should be present. From the machine - and particularly from the tool - point of view, there are restrictions as to the type and magnitude of crowning that can be realized. Crowning is a circular correction. Different kinds of crowning are distinguished by their direction. Length crowning, for example, is a circular (or 2nd order) material removal, starting at a reference point and extending in tooth length or face width.

Face Gears: An Interesting Alternative for Special Applications - Calculation, Production and Use
Crown gearings are not a new type of gear system. On the contrary, they have been in use since very early times for various tasks. Their earliest form is that of the driving sprocket, found in ancient Roman watermills or Dutch windmills. The first principles of gear geometry and simple methods of production (shaper cutting) were developed in the 1940s. In the 1950s, however, crown gears' importance declined. Their tasks were, for example, taken over by bevel gears, which were easier to manufacture and could transmit greater power. Current subject literature accordingly contains very little information on crown gears, directed mainly to pointing out their limitations (Ref. 1).

Departments

Gone Fishin' - Back After Gear Expo (Publishers Page)
It's summertime in the gear industry. Out my window, I see blue skies, green grass and trees swaying in the wind. In the background, I hear crickets chirping.

Letter to the Editor (Voices)
Current Letter to the Editor for September/October 2001.

Product News (Product News)
Complete Product News for September/October 2001.

Revolutions (Revolutions)
Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

Hidden Runout (Q&A)
Q&A is an interactive gear forum. Send us your gear design, manufacturing, inspection or other related questions, and we will pass them to our panel of experts.

Technical Calendar (Events)
Complete Technical Calendar for September/October 2001.

Industry News (Industry News)
Complete Industry News for September/October 2001.

Puzzling Together A Gear Pioneer (Addendum)
The Dictionary of American Biography describes him as "one of the founders of the gear-cutting industry in the United State." He built the first hobbing machine for cutting spur gears. He founded the companies that are now Boston Gear and Philadelphia Gear Corp.