Jack McGuinn

Jack McGuinn, Senior Editor, has a diverse, 20-year history in manufacturing, including management-level positions in quality assurance and testing; product development; marketing and promotion; and industrial journalism. He has been with Gear Technology since 2005. (Bio last updated 2018-02-05 Contact Randy Stott, Managing Editor, with changes.)

Articles by Jack McGuinn

  • Skiving is Thriving on a Global Scale (January/February 2018)
    Call it new wine in old bottles, or old wine in new bottles, but gear skiving has certainly aged well over time. Gear skiving's evolution, perhaps gaining momentum most dramatically since around 2004, has ultimately led to rather dramatic technological advancement and cost saving in the manufacture of certain gears.
  • For Christmas and Beyond (November/December 2017)
    When discussing the thinning of this country's potential manufacturing workforce, it is often maintained that technical training opportunities should be made available to grade school-age children who express interest. Get their attention while they're young and impressionable, the thinking goes — and hope their parents don't talk them out of it.
  • Coming Clean on Gearbox Lubrication (September/October 2017)
    Design and manufacture of gears is among the most complex and difficult disciplines of the industrial arts. From initial conception to machining and finishing, making gears ain't bean-bag. And guess what? Once those gears roll off the assembly line, it doesn't get any simpler. That's because gears - the metal ones at least - require the correct lubrication in order to prevent - or delay as long as possible - such things as wear, scuffing and Hertzian fatigue.
  • William Brunton: 19th Century Neglected - but Influential - Engineer (August 2017)
    Faithful readers of this space know we sometimes like to use Addendum to give relatively unknown 19th Century mechanical engineers/inventors their well-deserved props. Like, for example, William Brunton (1777-1851), who is credited - but generally unknown - with inventing the Steam Horse, also known as the Mechanical Traveler.
  • 2017 Gear Expo: Gears, Machinery and a Whole Lot More (August 2017)
    There is so much more to Gear Expo than gears or the machinery that makes them. That's because it takes much, much more to make a finished gear than even the most sophisticated machine. And it is exhibitors who are part of the "much, much, more" that are addressed in this article.
  • Gear Design Deconstructed (May 2017)
    How difficult is it to design a gear? It depends upon whom you ask.
  • Vive la Differential (March/April 2017)
    Your automobile's differential is easily one of its most important components. This becomes crystal clear to anyone that has ever had to pony up to replace one. The differential, that mathy-driven, mechanically complex system that keeps axles and pinions running smoothly was invented by a watchmaker - for a watch.
  • Swiss Watchmaking - with 3-D Printing (January/February 2017)
    For centuries, Switzerland has been considered home to the greatest watchmakers in the world. Works of fine beauty and optimal precision have been the norm there seemingly forever.
  • DIGITIZE or DIE (November/December 2016)
    In a capitalist society, the way things usually work is that government and academia focus on research and development, while industry focuses on commercialization. The result is an increasingly wide disconnect in the applied research sector, which deals primarily with technology development and demonstration.
  • AGMAs Go-To Gear Guys (September/October 2016)
    While the two have taught a variety of AGMA courses over the years, without question their most popular courses are Gear Failure Analysis (Errichello with longtime colleague Jane Muller) and Gearbox CSI: Forensic Analysis of Gear & Bearing Failures (Drago). Drago currently teaches Manufacturing & Inspection (with AGMA instructor Joseph W. Lenski, Jr.) and Gearbox System Design: The Rest of the Story - Everything but the Gears and Bearings (with AGMA instructor Steve Cymbala) as well.
  • What Was He Thinking (August 2016)
    Having read about an automobile race in France, Kohlsaat decided he'd host America's first auto race in Chicago. The year was 1895 and automobiles were still a great curiosity. Kohlsaat, owner/publisher of the Chicago Times Herald, planned to exploit the growing interest in motoring by sponsoring a 54-mile race from downtown Chicago to nearby suburb Evanston, Illinois, and back. The match was open to all comers, foreign or domestic, whether powered by gas, electricity, or steam. The top prize: $2,000 (that's 50,000 2016 dollars).
  • IMTS 2016: Economic Elixir (August 2016)
    Peter Eelman has been involved with the International Manufacturing Technology Show for more than 30 years. First as an exhibitor with Warner & Swasey Co.; later with Toyoda USA; later still as a consultant; and currently as vice president for exhibitions and business development, IMTS. He also serves on the board of directors of the exhibitor-appointed Contractor Association and is a former member of the board of directors for the Trade Show Exhibitors Association. Eelman is a speaker with the International Association of Exhibitions and Events and serves on the Metropolitan Chicago Pier & Exposition Authority Labor Council. As the head of IMTS, Eelman is the go-to, make-things-happen guy for the Chicago Convention and Tourism Bureau, the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority, McCormick Place and the various vendors, service providers and trade unions involved in the complex trade show process. In addition to IMTS, Eelman is also prominently involved in shows with an international presence.
  • NOME Is Where The Energy Is (May 2016)
    According to the U.K.-based WITT Energy website (witt-energy.com), "The WITT is the only device in the world that can capture energy from all movement and turn it into electricity. No other energy system can exploit the full spectrum of movement, enabling it to harvest power from water (sea, river or tidal), wind and human or animal motion."
  • The End of an Era - Joe Franklin's Valedictory (May 2016)
    AGMA President Joe Franklin is stepping down after some 24 years on the job. He graciously took the time to answer some questions from Gear Technology Senior Editor Jack McGuinn regarding his tenure.
  • Plastic Gearing Continues Converting the Unconverted (March/April 2016)
    Plastic gears are everywhere today - throughout your car, at the oceans' lowest depths, in deep space. The question, when is a metal gear a candidate for plastic conversion, can be addressed in three words, i.e. what's the application?
  • Manufacturing Jobs Are There - Workers to Fill Them ARE NOT (July 2015)
    An all too common — and disturbing — question these days: Are you having trouble finding skilled workers? Taking that a step further begs the next question — Are you having trouble finding customers with
  • New Transmissions Make the Gas GREENER (July 2015)
    “Highway vehicles release about 1.7 billion tons of greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere each year — mostly in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2) — contributing to global climate change. The CO2 emissions of a car are directly proportional to the quantity of fuel consumed by an engine. In 2013, U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from transportation were second only to the electricity sector — an increase of about 16% since 1990.” (EPA.GOV).
  • Off-Highway or Off-Press, Andantex Focuses on Precision (June 2015)
    Andantex USA is a part of the worldwide Redex group, a longtime provider of high-precision motion control components and systems
  • Precision Gearing Lightens the Load for Off-Highway Equipment (June 2015)
    Faith — paraphrasing the gospels of Matthew and Mark — can move mountains. But it helps if you have precision geared equipment.
  • Henry Maudslay (May 2015)
    Here is some history that bears repeating - or at least re-reading. So take a few minutes to give it up for a long-gone Brit named Henry Maudslay (August 22, 1771 - February 14, 1831) - also known as "A Founding Father of Machine Tool Technology." You might also consider him an early leader in inspection, as he also invented the first bench micrometer capable of measuring to one ten-thousandth of an inch.
  • 3-D Printing: We Ain't Seen Nothing Yet (March/April 2015)
    NASA is now 3-D-printing spare parts up at the ISS (International Space Station). And in zero-gravity environments. And some of these parts are small gears and actuators, for starters. Every indication is that the list of power transmission-type parts to be converted will soon grow.
  • 2015: MORE OF THE SAME (November/December 2014)
    From a technological perspective, there typically aren't many EUREKA! breakthroughs in the "state of the gear industry" to report, and 2014 was really no different.
  • From Bauhaus to Gearbox (September/October 2014)
    Arguably the city of Chicago’s most compelling, dynamic period — early 1930s -1960 — is dramatically evoked in Thomas Dyja’s 2013 book, THE THIRD COAST — When Chicago Built the American Dream.
  • LES GEARS LYONNAISE (September/October 2014)
    Soon upon setting down in this beautiful, former (43 B.C.) Roman Colony that is now the City of Lyon, I was careening to my hotel, Mach I-plastered to the back seat of a sleek, shinyblack Mercedes taxi, when I realized I was staring at - zut alors? - cornfields!
  • IMTS 2014: This is Big (August 2014)
    Here's everything you need to know about IMTS 2014, including an interview with Peter Eelman, AMT's VP of Exhibitions and Communications.