September/October 2015

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Feature Articles

The Modern Approach to Transmission System Design and Analysis
Over the last 15 years, there has been significant growth in the number of transmission types as well as their complexity: manual, conventional automatic, dual clutch, automated manual, continuously variable, split power and pure EV transmissions.

Gear Expo 2015 Product Preview
A look at Products being Presented at the Expo

Gear Expo 2015 Booth Listings
Listing of Booths at Gear Expo 2015

ASM Heat Treat 2015
ASM booths 2015

Technical Articles

Development of a Face Hobbed Spiral Bevel Gearset
This article is the fourth installment in Gear Technology's series of excerpts from Dr. Hermann J. Stadtfeld's book, Gleason Bevel Gear Technology. The first three excerpts can be found in our June, July and August 2015 issues. In the previous chapter, we demonstrated the development of a face-milled spiral bevel gearset. In this section, an analogue face-hobbed bevel gearset is derived.

Gear Tooth Surface Roughness of Helical Gears Manufactured by a Form Milling Cutter
Manufacturing involute gears using form grinding or form milling wheels are beneficial to hobs in some special cases, such as small scale production and, the obvious, manufacture of internal gears. To manufacture involute gears correctly the form wheel must be purpose-designed, and in this paper the geometry of the form wheel is determined through inverse calculation. A mathematical model is presented where it is possible to determine the machined gear tooth surface in three dimensions, manufactured by this tool, taking the finite number of cutting edges into account. The model is validated by comparing calculated results with the observed results of a gear manufactured by an indexable insert milling cutter.

Local Simulation of the Specific Material Removal Rate for Generating Gear Grinding
Generating gear grinding is one of the most important finishing processes for small and medium-sized gears, its process design often determined by practical knowledge. Therefore a manufacturing simulation with the capability to calculate key values for the process — such as the specific material removal rate — is developed here. Indeed, this paper presents first results of a model for a local analysis of the value. Additionally, an empirical formula — based on a multiple regression model for a global value describing the process — is provided.

Departments

You Dont Have to Climb a Mountain (Publishers Page)
If only there were some source of endless knowledge, experience and wisdom to guide you through your gear-related problems. If only there were some philosopher on a mountaintop whose sole purpose was to bring enlightenment to your gear noise problems, to unravel the mysteries of profile shift, to provide insight to a critical gear manufacturing problem or to explain the meaning of life (gear life, that is).

Product News (Product News)
News about New Products

Gear Macrogeometry (Ask the Expert)
I have outsourced gear macrogeometry due to lack of resources. Now I received the output from them and one of the gears is with —0.8× module correction factor for m = 1.8 mm gear. Since bending root stress and specific slide is at par with specification, but negative correction factor —0.8× module — is quite high — how will it influence NVH behavior/transmission error? SAP and TIF are very close to 0.05 mm; how will that influence the manufacturing/cost?

Liebherr - Barber Colman Hob Settings (Ask the Expert)
I would like some instructions for setting the degrees and minutes on a Liebherr or Barber Colman hob. Our machines use a Vernier scale to match the lead angle of the cutter to the part to form straight teeth. There is a dispute on how to do this task, and I wanted insight from another professional.

Calendar (Events)
Calendar of Events

Industry News (Industry News)
News from the Gear Industry

The Watch That Does Everything, Plus Tells Time (Addendum)
There’s a silly ongoing joke in the 2002 family film Spy Kids 2 (a movie that I’m admittedly not very proud I’ve seen, but hey, I was 12 at the time) involving a super advanced secret agent watch that does everything but tell time.