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1 Solutions for Your Process Engineer Shortage (January/February 2018)

As you might imagine, I talk to many gear industry people through the course of my day-to-day activities. And there is one question that I hear over and over again. "Joe, we need an experienced gear process engineer. Do you know anyone who's available?"

2 Gearheads Rejoice! The Internal Combustion Engine is Back (May 2011)

The opposed-piston internal combustion engine is making a comeback.

3 It's No American Dream: Pratt & Whitney GTF Engine Now a Reality... (November/December 2011)

In the August 2008 issue of Gear Technology, we ran a story (“Gearbox Speed Reducer Helps Fan Technology for ‘Greener” Jet Fuel Efficiency’) on the then ongoing, extremely challenging and protracted development of Pratt & Whitney’s geared turbofan (GTF) jet engine.

4 Gear Fundamentals Reverse Engineering (July/August 1991)

Whether gear engineers have to replace an old gear which is worn out, find out what a gear's geometry is after heat treatment distortion, or just find out parameters of gears made by a competitor, sometimes they are challenged with a need to determine the geometry of unknown gears. Depending on the degree of accuracy required, a variety of techniques are available for determining the accuracy of an unknown gear. If a high degree of precision is important, a gear inspection device has to be used to verify the results. Frequently, several trial-and-error attempts are made before the results reach the degree of precision required.

5 Babbage's Engines (June 2017)

Though we think of the computer as a distinctly 20th Century invention, Charles Babbage designed several precursors way back in the early 1800s.

6 The U.S. Needs More Engineers (March/April 2008)

State Schools Lack Funding. Who Loses? We all do.

7 Like to Have Your Own Airplane (November/December 2014)

Were Thomas Jefferson around today, he'd be all over the Double-A engine's development and everything it represents. And what is the Double-A engine; what does its successful design and execution represent, you ask?

8 Engineering Constants (July/August 1986)

Below are listed a variety of commonly used constants arranged numerically to permit ease of reference. Wherever an asterisk (*) is shown, the constant is exact as given, it being generally a mathematical constant or one fixed by definition. In cases where the first constant listed is followed by another in parenthesis, the first is the round number generally used, while the second is the more exact value.

9 Engineering Constants (September/October 1986)

Rules and Formula for Gear Sizes

10 The Little Steam Engine That Did. (May/June 2000)

When the steam engine became available for industrial use at the end of the eighteenth century, it was mainly used for driving plunger-pumps, such as those used in English coal mines. The stream engine's piston drove a lever, that reciprocating motion of which drove the pump plunger. Called the "Beam Machine," this mechanism needed a lot of space, had many parts, and was difficult to install because the engine and the pump had to be properly aligned.

11 Super-Sized Quality Control (January/February 2014)

It's not easy being big. Maybe that's not exactly how the phrase goes, but it's applicable, particularly when discussing the quality requirements of large gears. The size alone promises unique engineering challenges. BONUS Online Exclusive: Big or Small - Inspection is Key to Success.

12 Gear Engineer by Day, Baritone by Night (January/February 2014)

When they’re not solving the latest mechanical engineering puzzle, the seven members of the group sINGer are busy engineering their voices to create the perfect sound. Yes, you read that correctly. Mechanical engineers do have hobbies outside of gears.

13 What's the Right Tolerance (March/April 2006)

Charles Schultz of Brad Foote Gear Works discusses some of the finer points of engineering tolerances--and muscle cars.

14 Refurbishing a Ball Mill ; Bevel Gear Backlash (September 2012)

Our experts comment on reverse engineering herringbone gears and contact pattern optimization.

15 Gear Shop of Tomorrow (November/December 2016)

It's Monday morning, December 15, 2036. An autonomous vehicle drops off two engineers in front of a gear manufacturing facility in Metro Detroit. They punch in for work on their wristwatches and pay Uber for the ride on a smartphone. One of the engineers begins walking the shop floor, monitoring a series of collaborative robots using a tablet the size of a paperback novel. These robots interact right on the floor with the minimal staff scheduled to oversee manufacturing operations. Another engineer wears an interactive headset and begins training a group of new engineers (in real time) from China using some form of augmented reality.

16 The Three Rs of Gearbox Repair: Repair, Refurbish, Replace (August 2018)

"If it ain't broke, don't fix it," goes the hoary bromide. But what if the time comes - and it most surely will - that in fact it is broke? Do you fix it or replace it? And when does gearbox maintenance and repair arrive at a point of diminishing returns and buying new is the answer?

17 Gear Expo 2017 and ASM Heat Treat 2017 Booth Previews (September/October 2017)

The latest technology on display in Columbus, OH. October 24-26.

18 Optimism in Wind Abounds (January/February 2009)

Big gears and wind turbines go together like bees and honey, peas and carrots, bread and butter and—well, you get the idea. Wind isn’t just big right now, it’s huge. The wind industry means tremendous things for the energy dependent world we live in and especially big things for gear manufacturers and other beleaguered American industries.

19 Cyber Physical Gear Production System: A Vision of Industry 4.0 Gear Production (January/February 2018)

This report describes Klingelnberg's vision of Industry 4.0 gear production.

20 Holding Fast, Bouncing Back (January/February 2018)

Business is finally starting to get back to usual in the big gear world, which offers us a chance to look back at the greatest lesson on how to survive an economic downturn. Includes the sidebar: "Brass Tacks with Klingelnberg."

21 High-Tech Risks and Rewards (June 2009)

Aerospace/Defense contracts offer unique challenges for gear manufacturers.

22 Chamfering-Deburring Still a Player - Now More than Ever (September/October 2018)

Chamfering and deburring have been described as "unloved," a "necessary evil" and, in fact - "dead." After all, manual deburring is still common in many shops.

23 Speed Matters - In Racing and in Hobbing (August 2017)

RCD Engineering's switch from manual to CNC hobbing operations breaks gear manufacturing lead time records with Bourn & Koch 100H in their gear production pit crew.

24 Much Ado About Nothing (July 2017)

For over 50 years, the Do Nothing Machine has entertained the public eye with its complex machinery, a mountain of over 700 gears put together for the express purpose of doing nothing.

25 Looming Large (January/February 2016)

Let's talk about large gears. Not the size or scope or inspection process, but the forecast and market potential in areas that utilize these massive components. We'll examine key industry segments like energy and mining and tap IHS Economics for a forecast for 2016 and 2017 (spoiler alert: it's not great). Additionally, we'll discuss some of the critical factors influencing global big gear manufacturers Ferry-Capitain and Hofmann Engineering.

26 Product News (November/December 2015)

News about recent products

27 Determining Bull Gear Wear (July 2015)

We are currently experiencing wear on the bull gear on our converter at the steel plant. We want to be able to draw the original gear profile to compare this with the worn tooth before we decide on the next steps. I have attempted this, but there is a correction factor given and I am unsure how to apply this. Could someone give advice on this? Please find attached the PDF’s for the bull gear and the pinion gear. They are old drawings! The wear is on the wheel.

28 Industry News (October 2013)

The complete Industry News section from the October 2013 issue of Gear Technology.

29 ...And from the Industry (October/November 1984)

Industry News from October/November 1984 Gear Technology.

30 Going to Gear Expo (September 2013)

Like many of you in the gear industry, we’ve been working extremely hard over the past few months getting ready for Gear Expo 2013, which takes place September 17-19 in Indianapolis.

31 Viewpoint (November/December 1991)

Dear Editor: In Mr. Yefim Kotlyar's article "Reverse Engineering" in the July/August issue, I found an error in the formula used to calculate the ACL = Actual lead from the ASL = Assumed lead.

32 My Gear Is Bigger than Your Gear (March/April 2013)

Industry battles it out for World's Largest Gear title.

33 The Replacements - Taking Steps to Strengthen the Future Skilled Workforce (January/February 2009)

For years, politicians, educators and business leaders have generated various ideas to revitalize U.S. manufacturing and engineering. These include manufacturing initiatives, internal training programs and an emphasis on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in the classroom. The declining expertise in these fields, however, continues to be a growing problem in every facet of manufacturing and engineering.

34 The Toys That Make Engineering Noise (May 2019)

Last year, Hot Wheels celebrated its 50th anniversary. While a writing gig in manufacturing and engineering probably sounded surreal to the 8-year-old version of this author, truth be told, he was obsessed with Hot Wheels and Matchbox toys for most of his childhood. Somewhere in a box in the basement there’s a 1967 Camaro and a 1953 Corvette that would still bring a smile to this face.

35 William Brunton: 19th Century Neglected - but Influential - Engineer (August 2017)

Faithful readers of this space know we sometimes like to use Addendum to give relatively unknown 19th Century mechanical engineers/inventors their well-deserved props. Like, for example, William Brunton (1777-1851), who is credited - but generally unknown - with inventing the Steam Horse, also known as the Mechanical Traveler.

36 If He Builds It, Will They Come (September/October 1999)

Richard Spens has been rebuilding antique machine tools for nearly a decade. He is drawn to the ornate architecture and fascinated by the open design that allows you to see inside a machine as it operates. "Working with machines has been a lifelong thing with me," said Spens, now a design engineer. "I started building steam engines when I was 10 years old." What he's working on now, however, is bigger than any steam engine or machine tool. In rural Livonia, Michigan, Spens is converting an old dairy barn into an accurate recreation of a turn-of-the-century, belt driven gear shop. It's an outgrowth of his interest in antique machine tools and, he feels, a way to stem the tide that is costing America so many manufacturing and skilled trade jobs.

37 Prominent Gear Engineer Darle Dudley: 1917 - 2003 (July/August 2003)

Darle Dudley, an internationally known gear engineer, of San Diego, CA, died April 11 of hear problems and a serious infection. He was 86 years old.

38 Reverse Engineering of Pure Involute Cylindrical Gears Using Conventional Measurement Tools (January/February 2000)

Designing a gear set implies a considerable effort in the determination of the geometry that fulfills the requirements of load capacity, reliability, durability, size, etc. When the objective is to design a new set of gears, there are many alternatives for the design, and the designer has the freedom to choose among them. Reverse engineering implies an even bigger challenge to the designer, because the problem involves already manufactured gears whose geometry is generally unknown. In this case, the designer needs to know the exact geometry of the actual gears in order to have a reference for the design.

39 Product Liability for Engineers (July/August 1998)

This textbook, written for college level engineering students, gives a basic grounding in the complexities of product liability law. It also provides useful information to those of us involved in the manufacturing of gears and gear systems in that the fundamental concepts apply to all types of manufacturers.

40 The Top Ten Books for Gear Engineers (May/June 1992)

When I was new to gear engineering, I found the array of gear literature scare, and the information scattered and conflicting. After investigating the materials available, I set the goal of creating an annotated listing of the references. There are many valuable resources, but for this article I have selected ten of the best. These references, in my opinion, are the most useful, and cover the scope while minimizing redundancy.

41 Leonardo, the Engineer (January/February 1989)

These lines, interesting enough, are from the notebooks of an artist whose images are part of the basic iconography of Western culture. Even people who have never set foot in a museum and wouldn't know a painting by Corregio from a sculpture by Calder, recognize the Mona Lisa. But Leonardo da Vinci was much more than an artist. He was also a man of science who worked in anatomy, botany, cartography, geology, mathematics, aeronautics, optics, mechanics, astronomy, hydraulics, sonics, civil engineering, weaponry and city planning. There was little in nature that did not interest Leonardo enough to at least make a sketch of it. Much of it became a matter of lifelong study. The breadth of his interests, knowledge, foresight, innovation and imagination is difficult to grasp.

42 Application of Gears with Asymmetric Teeth in Turboprop Engine Gearbox (January/February 2008)

This paper describes the research and development of the first production gearbox with asymmetric tooth profiles for the TV7-117S turboprop engine. The paper also presents numerical design data related to development of this gearbox.

43 Desktop Gear Engineering (May 2011)

An update on the latest gear design software from several vendors, plus what gear design engineers can expect next.

44 FYI...New Books for Gear Engineers (March/April 1995)

Review of several new books for gear engineers.

45 Investigation of the Strength of Gear Teeth (November/December 1992)

To mechanical engineers, the strength of gear teeth is a question of constant recurrence, and although the problem to be solved is quite elementary in character, probably no other question could be raised upon which such a diversity of opinion exists, and in support of which such an array of rules and authorities might be quoted. In 1879, Mr. John H. Cooper, the author of a well-known work on "Belting," made an examination of the subject and found there were then in existence about forty-eight well-established rules for horsepower and working strength, sanctioned by some twenty-four authorities, and differing from each other in extreme causes of 500%. Since then, a number of new rules have been added, but as no rules have been given which take account of the actual tooth forms in common use, and as no attempt has been made to include in any formula the working stress on the material so that the engineer may see at once upon what assumption a given result is based, I trust I may be pardoned for suggesting that a further investigation is necessary or desirable.

46 Future Demands Next Generation of Standards and Practices in Gear Industry (May 2010)

Gear manufacturers are moving into an era that will see changes in both engineering practices and industry standards as new end-products evolve. Within the traditional automotive industry, carbon emission reduction legislation will drive the need for higher levels of efficiency and growth in electric and hybrid vehicles. Meanwhile, the fast growing market of wind turbines is already opening up a whole new area of potential for gearbox manufacturers, but this industry is one that will demand reliability, high levels of engineering excellence and precision manufacturing.

47 Improved Worm Gear Performance with Colloidal Molybdenum Disulfide Containing Lubricants (November/December 1988)

Worm gear speed reducers give the design engineer considerable options, but these gear systems present a challenge to the lubrication engineer. Heat energy generated by the high rate of sliding and friction in the contact zone causes worm gears to be relatively inefficient compared to other gear types. Because worm gears operate under a boundary or near-boundary lubrication regime, a satisfactory lubricant should contain a friction modifier to alleviate these conditions.

48 Optimum Shot Peening Specification - I (November/December 1991)

Shot peening is widely recognized as a prove, cost-effective process to enhance the fatigue characteristics of metal parts and eliminate the problems of stress corrosion cracking. Additional benefits accrue in the areas of forming and texturizing. Though shot peening is widely used today, the means of specifying process parameters and controlling documents for process control are not widely understood. Questions regarding shot size, intensity, and blueprint specification to assure a high quality and repeatable shot peening process are continually asked by many design and materials engineers. This article should answer many of the questions frequently asked by engineering professionals and to further assist companies interested in establishing a general shot peening specification.

49 Cleaner Steels Provide Gear Design Opportunities (November/December 2017)

Gear designers face constant pressure to increase power density in their drivetrains. In the automotive industry, for example, typical engine torque has increased significantly over the last several decades. Meanwhile, the demands for greater fuel efficiency mean designers must accommodate these increased loads in a smaller, more lightweight package than ever before. In addition, electric and hybrid vehicles will feature fewer gears, with fewer transmission speeds, running at higher rpms, meaning the gears in those systems will have to endure life cycles far beyond what is typical with internal combustion engines.

50 The European Rack Shift Coefficient 'X' for Americans (July/August 1993)

The use of dimensionless factors to describe gear tooth geometry seems to have a strong appeal to gear engineers. The stress factors I and J, for instance, are well established in AGMA literature. The use of the rack shift coefficient "x" to describe nonstandard gear proportions is common in Europe, but is not as commonly used in the United States. When it is encountered in the European literature or in the operating manuals for imported machine tools, it can be a source of confusion to the American engineer.

51 Plastic Gear Design Remains a Work in Progress (July 2018)

Despite the development and availability of a number of newly engineered, rugged materials intended for plastic gear applications, some engineers/designers continue to believe metal is better.

52 Eliot K. Buckingham (July/August 1997)

His resume reads like that of many gear engineers of his generation: the stint in the army during World War II; the break for college in the late 40s; deliberately vague descriptions of projects for the Air Force in the New Mexico desert in the early 50s; the corporate engineering jobs later on in the decade.

53 A Proposed Pre-Finish Cylindrical Gear Quality Standard (September/October 2016)

This proposed standard would not make any recommendations regarding the required quality for any application. The intent is to establish standard pre-finish quality classes for typical finishing operations, which only include the inspection elements that are important to properly evaluate pre-finish gear quality as it applies to the finishing operation. It would be the responsibility of the manufacturing/process engineer, quality engineer, or other responsible individual to establish the required pre-finish quality class for their application.

54 Romax Technology Launches Gearbox and Driveline Design Software Package (November/December 2012)

Romax Technology, the gearbox, bearing and driveline engineering specialist, has launched a new design software package that will increase speed, quality, creativity and innovation when designing gearboxes and drivelines. Called Concept, the new product delivers on the Romax vision of streamlining the end-to-end, planning-to-manufacture process with open, easy to use software solutions. It has been developed in close collaboration with engineers in the largest ground vehicle, wind energy and industrial equipment companies around the globe.

55 Automotive Transmission Design Using Full Potential of Powder Metal (August 2013)

For metal replacement with powder metal (PM) of an automotive transmission, PM gear design differs from its wrought counterpart. Indeed, complete reverse-engineering and re-design is required so to better understand and document the performance parameters of solid-steel vs. PM gears. Presented here is a re-design (re-building a 6-speed manual transmission for an Opel Insignia 4-cylinder, turbocharged 2-liter engine delivering 220 hp/320 N-m) showing that substituting a different microgeometry of the PM gear teeth -- coupled with lower Young’s modulus -- theoretically enhances performance when compared to the solid-steel design.

56 Give Your Gears a Break - Select the Right Coupling! (May/June 1987)

How important is the right choice of coupling in determining successful machine design? Consider the following example. A transmission of appropriate size was needed to transfer the speed of the engine driver to that of the driven generator. The transmission was properly selected and sized to endure the rated power requirements indefinitely, but after only a short time in operation, it failed anyway. What happened? The culprit in the case was a coupling. It provided the necessary power and protection against misalignment but it lacked the ability to isolate the gears from the torque peaks of the diesel engine.

57 Describing Nonstandard Gears - An Alternative to the Rack Shift Coefficient (January/February 1988)

The use of dimensionless factors to describe gear tooth geometry seems to have a strong appeal to gear engineers. The stress factors I and J, for instance, are well established in AGMA literature. The use of the rack shift coefficient "x" to describe nonstandard gear proportions is common in Europe, but is not as commonly used in the United States. When it is encountered in the European literature or in the operating manuals for imported machine tools, it can be a source of confusion to the American engineer.

58 Engineered Gear Steels: A Review (November/December 2002)

The selection of the proper steel for a given gear application is dependent on many factors. This paper discusses the many aspects related to material, design, manufacture, and application variables. The results of several studies on the optimization of alloy design for gas- and plasma- carburization processing and reviewed.

59 Application Examples from "Optimizing Gear Geometry for Minimum Transmission Error, Mesh Friction Losses and Scuffing Risk Through Computer- Aided Engineering" (August 2010)

Examples from gears in wind turbine, automotive and industrial applications.

60 Innovative Steel Design and Gear Machining of Advanced Engineering Steel (August 2016)

The increasing demands in the automotive industry for weight reduction, fuel efficiency and a reduced carbon footprint need to be addressed urgently. Up until now, widely used conventional steels have lived up to expectations. However, with more stringent emissions standards, demands on materials are increasing. Materials are expected to perform better, resulting in a need for increased fatigue strength. A possibility to increase torque on current generations without design changes can be achieved by selecting suitable materials.

61 Engineering Questions - SME has the Answers with Knowledge Edge (August 2013)

The Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) has been gathering, validating and sharing manufacturing knowledge for more than 80 years. Traditionally, SME resources were purchased by individuals for their own personal use or by colleges and universities as textbooks. Recently, these same colleges and universities were looking for digital resources to provide to their instructors and students. Companies were requesting SME content digitally for their employees as well.

62 The Global Challenge to America's Engineering and Innovation Position (January/February 2012)

John P. Walter and Abby Dress analyze the challenges facing America's manufacturers to remain competitive in a global environment.

63 Engineering Constants (May/June 1987)

Rules and Formula for worm gears, bevel gears and strength of gear teeth.

64 Performance and Machining of Advanced Engineering Steels in Power Transmission Applications - Continued Developments (May 2017)

It is becoming increasingly apparent that material properties can and will play a greater role than before in addressing the challenges most transmission manufacturers are facing today. Making use of materials' intrinsic fatigue properties provides a new design tool to support the market changes taking place.

65 Optimizing Gear Geometry for Minimum Transmission Error, Mesh Friction Losses and Scuffing Risk Through Computer- Aided Engineering (August 2010)

Minimizing gear losses caused by churning, windage and mesh friction is important if plant operating costs and environmental impact are to be minimized. This paper concentrates on mesh friction losses and associated scuffing risk. It describes the preliminary results from using a validated, 3-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) program to optimize cylindrical gears for low friction losses without compromising transmission error (TE), noise and power density. Some case studies and generic procedures for minimizing losses are presented. Future development and further validation work is discussed.

66 How to Minimize Power Losses in Transmissions, Axles and Steering Systems (September 2012)

By increasing the number of gears and the transmission-ratio spread, the engine will run with better fuel efficiency and without loss of driving dynamics. Transmission efficiency itself can be improved by: using fuelefficient transmission oil; optimizing the lubrication systems and pumps; improving shifting strategies and optimizing gearings; and optimizing bearings and seals/gaskets.

67 Cutting Hardened Gears (November/December 2002)

The need for improved power transmissions that use gears and gearboxes with smaller overall dimensions and with lower noise generation has left manufacturing engineers searching for different methods of gear processing. This search has led to the requirement of hardened gears.

68 Optimizing Plastic Gear Geometry: An Inroduction to Gear Optimization (May/June 2002)

There are numerous engineering evaluations required to design gear sets for optimum performance with regard to torque capacity, noise, size and cost. How much cost savings and added gear performance is available through optimization? Cost savings of 10% to 30% and 100% added capacity are not unusual. The contrast is more pronounced if the original design was prone to failure and not fit for function.

69 Systematic Investigations on the Influence of Viscosity Index Improvers on EHL Film Thickness (November/December 2001)

Mineral-oil-base lubricants show a significant decrease of kinematic viscosity with rising temperature, as exemplified in Figure 1 by lubricants for vehicle gears. An important attribute of lubricants is their viscosity index (VI), according to DIN/ISO 2909 (Ref. 4). Viscosity index is a calculated coefficient, which characterizes the change of viscosity of lubricants as a function of temperature. A high viscosity index represents a low variation of viscosity due to temperature and vice versa. A low viscosity-temperature-dependence is required for lubricants that are operated at significantly varying temperature conditions, such as vehicle engine and gear lubricants in summer and winter time. This way, the oils remain flowing and pumpable at low temperatures on the one hand; and on the other hand, sufficiently thick lubricant films can be formed at higher temperatures for a safe separation of the surfaces.

70 Dry Hobbing Process Technology Road Map (March/April 2001)

Recent trends in gear cutting technology have left process engineers searching for direction about which combination of cutting tool material, coating, and process technology will afford the best quality at the lowest total cost. Applying the new technologies can have associated risks that may override the potential cost savings. The many interrelated variables to be considered and evaluated tend to cloud the issue and make hobbing process development more difficult.

71 Austempered Gears and Shafts: Tough Solutions (March/April 2001)

Austempered irons and steels offer the design engineer alternatives to conventional material/process combinations. Depending on the material and the application, austempering may provide the producers of gear and shafts with the following benefits: ease of manufacturing, increased bending and/or contact fatigue strength, better wear resistance or enhanced dampening characteristics resulting in lower noise. Austempered materials have been used to improve the performance of gears and shafts in many applications in a wide range of industries.

72 The Submerged Induction Hardening of Gears (March/April 2001)

The tooth-by-tooth, submerged induction hardening process for gear tooth surface hardening has been successfully performed at David Brown for more than 30 years. That experience - backed up by in-depth research and development - has given David Brown engineers a much greater understanding of, and confidence in, the results obtainable from the process. Also, field experience and refinement of gear design and manufacturing procedures to accommodate the induction hardening process now ensure that gears so treated are of guaranteed quality.

73 Gears With Ears (March/April 2001)

When you're manufacturing fun, very often you need gears. The Addendum team recently went on a behind-the-scenes gear-finding mission with Jerold S. Kaplan, Principal Engineer, Show/Ride Mechanical Engineering at Walt Disney Imagineering in Lake Buena Vista, FL. We found that at least part of Disney's magic comes from good, old-fashioned mechanical engineering.

74 Cast Iron: A Solid choice for Reducing Gear Noise (September/October 1999)

Material selection can play an important role in the constant battle to reduce gear noise. Specifying tighter dimensional tolerances or redesigning the gear are the most common approaches design engineers take to minimize noise, but either approach can add cost to the finished part and strain the relationship between the machine shop and the end user. A third, but often overlooked, alternative is to use a material that has high noise damping capabilities. One such material is cast iron.

75 A Bard of Science (July/August 2000)

Oliver E Saari was an engineer with two great professional loves in his life - writing and gear design, and he was devoted to each in their turn. The same original thinking that informed his fiction, giving life to tales of space exploration, the evolution of man, and many other topics, let him to become one of the great pioneers in gear design.

76 Analyzing Gear Tooth Stress as a Function of Tooth Contact Pattern Shape and Position (January/February 1985)

The development of a new gear strength computer program based upon the finite element method, provides a better way to calculate stresses in bevel and hypoid gear teeth. The program incorporates tooth surface geometry and axle deflection data to establish a direct relationship between fillet bending stress, subsurface shear stress, and applied gear torque. Using existing software links to other gear analysis programs allows the gear engineer to evaluate the strength performance of existing and new gear designs as a function of tooth contact pattern shape, position and axle deflection characteristics. This approach provides a better understanding of how gears react under load to subtle changes in the appearance of the no load tooth contact pattern.

77 Development of Gear Technology and Theory of Gearing (July/August 1999)

I must admit that after thumbing through the pages of this relatively compact volume (113 pages, 8.5 x 11 format), I read its three chapters(theory of gearing, geometry and technology, and biographical history) from rear to front. It will become obvious later in this discussion why I encourage most gear engineers to adopt this same reading sequence!

78 Kish Method for Dermination of Hunting Mesh (May/June 1997)

When designing a gear set, engineers usually want the teeth of the gear (Ng) and the pinion (Np) in a "hunting" mesh. Such a mesh or combination is defined as one in which the pinion and the gear do not have any common divisor by a prime number. If a mesh is "hunting," then the pinion must make Np x Ng revolutions before the same pinion tooth meshes with the same gear space. It is often easy to determine if a mesh is hunting by first determining if both the pinion and the gear teeth are divisible by 2,3,5,7,etc. (prime numbers). However, in this age of computerization, how does one program the computer to check for hunting teeth? A simple algorithm is shown below.

79 A Conversation With Darle Dudley (May/June 1997)

For many years, when gear engineers have been confronted with tough problems either in the field or on the drawing board, one of the inevitable suggestions has been, "Ask Darle Dudley," or "Check the Dudley book." That's not surprising. With more than fifty years' experience in gear design and credits for five books (with translations in French, German, Spanish and Italian), numerous papers, lectures, and patents, and a worldwide reputation as a gear expert, Darle Dudley's position as one of the men to ask when dealing with knotty gear problems is unassailable.

80 Fatigue Aspects of Case Hardened Gears (March/April 1999)

The efficient and reliable transmission of mechanical power continues, as always, to be a central area of concern and study in mechanical engineering. The transmission of power involves the interaction of forces which are transmitted by specially developed components. These components must, in turn, withstand the complex and powerful stresses developed by the forces involved. Gear teeth transmit loads through a complex process of positive sliding, rolling and negative sliding of the contacting surfaces. This contact is responsible for both the development of bending stresses at the root of the gear teeth and the contact stresses a the contacting flanks.

81 Plastic: The Not-So-Alternative Technology (July/August 1998)

"We're taking over," says Art Milano. It's a bold statement from the engineering manager of Seitz Corporation, one of the largest manufacturers of injection molded plastic gears, but Milano has reason for his optimism. Plastic gears are big business-probably bigger than most gear industry "insiders" realize.

82 Thoughts For Gear Technologists (May/June 1998)

Every now and then, it strikes us as wise to keep our thoughts to ourselves and let our betters speak for us. Therefore, we present to you a collection of observations on work; science and other items of interest to gear engineers.

83 Gear Teeth With Byte (January/February 1998)

Computers are everywhere. It's gotten so that it's hard to find an employee who isn't using one in the course of his or her day - whether he be CEO or salesman, engineer or machinist. Everywhere you look, you find the familiar neutral-colored boxes and bright glowing screens. And despite the gear industry's traditional reluctance to embrace new technology, more and moe of what you find on those screens are gears.

84 The Effect of Flexible Components on the Durability, Whine, Rattle and Efficiency of an Automotive Transaxle Geartrain System (November/December 2009)

Gear engineers have long recognized the importance of considering system factors when analyzing a single pair of gears in mesh. These factors include important considerations such as load sharing in multi-mesh geartrains and bearing clearances, in addition to the effects of flexible components such as housings, gear blanks, shafts and carriers for planetary geartrains. However, in recent years, transmission systems have become increasingly complex—with higher numbers of gears and components—while the quality requirements and expectations in terms of durability, gear whine, rattle and efficiency have increased accordingly.

85 30 Years of Calculation (June 2014)

Examining the history of software in mechanical engineering

86 AGMA FTM: Where Great Minds and Manufacturing Mesh (November/December 2012)

Another year, another AGMA Fall Technical Conference. But this is no ho-hum event. Not when every year, the conference attracts some of the greatest mechanical engineering minds on the planet, along with representatives of the world’s greatest manufacturing entities. And who knows—perhaps one day there will be an extraterrestrial contingent—the science is that good. And all of it readily applicable to real-world manufacturing.

87 Bevel Gear Cutting Methods (June 2016)

THE FINAL CHAPTER This is the last in the series of chapters excerpted from Dr. Hermann J. Stadtfeld's Gleason Bevel Gear Technology - a book written for specialists in planning, engineering, gear design and manufacturing. The work also addresses the technical information needs of researchers, scientists and students who deal with the theory and practice of bevel gears and other angular gear systems. While all of the above groups are of course of invaluable importance to the gear industry, it is surely the students who hold the key to its future. And with that knowledge it is reassuring to hear from Dr. Stadtfeld of the enthusiastic response he has received from younger readers of these chapter installments.

88 Why Select Gear Grinding with cBN (November/December 2018)

Cubic Boron Nitride (cBN) abrasive wheels, which are a specially engineered abrasive grain referred to as a superabrasive, typically yield 2,200 - 2,500 parts per dress with one wheel lasting as long as four to six months.

89 NVH Potential of PM Gears for Electrified Drivetrains (September/October 2018)

Electrification has already started to have a noticeable impact on the global automotive industry. As a result, the drivetrains of hybrid (HEV) and full electric vehicles (EV) are facing many challenges, like increased requirements for NVH in high speed e-Drives and the need for performance improvements to deal with recuperation requirements. Motivated by the positive validation results of surface densified manual transmission gears which are also applicable for dedicated hybrid transmissions (DHTs) like e-DCTs, GKN engineers have been looking for a more challenging application for PM gears within those areas.

90 Lively New Book on what Distinguishes Manufacturing Precision from Perfection (August 2018)

Most of us would agree that the idea of a perfect world is absurd. Just for starters, who gets to decide what perfect means? "The Perfectionists" by Simon Winchester explores this theme as it relates to engineering.

91 Prediction of Dynamic Factors for Helical Gears in a High-Speed Multibody Gearbox System (May 2018)

Accurate prediction of gear dynamic factors (also known as Kv factors) is necessary to be able to predict the fatigue life of gears. Standards-based calculations of gear dynamic factors have some limitations. In this paper we use a multibody dynamic model, with all 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) of a high-speed gearbox to calculate gear dynamic factors. The findings from this paper will help engineers to understand numerous factors that influence the prediction of dynamic factors and will help them to design more reliable gears.

92 Analysis of Excitation Behavior of Two-Stage Gearbox Based Upon Validated Simulation Model (September/October 2017)

In order to reduce costs for development and production, the objective in gearbox development and design is to predict running and noise behavior of a gearbox without manufacturing a prototype and running expensive experimental investigations. To achieve this objective, powerful simulation models have to be set up in a first step. Afterwards, those models have to be qualified and compared to experimental investigations. During the investigation procedure of gearboxes, there are two possibilities to evaluate the running and noise behavior: quasi-static and dynamic investigations. In times of engine downsizing, e-mobility and lightweight design, the dynamic excitation behavior is becoming increasingly important.

93 What's New and Noteworthy in Powder Metal (September/October 2017)

First, the facts: powder metallurgy is a cost-effective method of forming precision net-shape metal components that allows for more efficiently designed products. It saves valuable raw materials through recycling and the elimination of costly secondary-machining. PM competes with wrought steel gears as the technology continues to advance. You'll find PM components in everything from automobile transmissions to aircraft turbine engines, surgical equipment and power tools.

94 Determination of Maximum Loads for Drivetrain Components in Thrusters Using Flexible Multibody-System Models (August 2017)

The usage of modern thrusters allows combining the functions of the drive and the ship rudder in one unit, which are separated in conventional ship propulsion systems. The horizontally oriented propeller is supported in a vertically rotatable nacelle that is mounted underneath the ship's hull. The propeller can directly or indirectly be driven by an electric motor or combustion engine. Direct drive requires the installation of a low-speed electric motor in the nacelle. This present paper concentrates on indirect drives where the driving torque is transferred by bevel gear stages and shafts from the motor to the propeller.

95 Calendar (May 2017)

Upcoming gear-related engineering and technical events.

96 Managing Shop Floor Data (September/October 2016)

There's no substitute for a good software package in gear manufacturing. It's a critical shop floor tool that provides practical engineering services that customers appreciate. When you're in the business of specifying and procuring high quality gears, the software needs to meet many objectives including the consideration of all tolerances of center distance, tooth thickness and tip diameters, root diameters, fillets, etc. It's also imperative that the software updates include the latest revisions to the gear standards being used in the industry.

97 Gear Backlash Analysis of Unloaded Gear Pairs in Transmissions (June 2016)

A best practice in gear design is to limit the amount of backlash to a minimum value needed to accommodate manufacturing tolerances, misalignments, and deflections, in order to prevent the non-driving side of the teeth to make contact and rattle. Industry standards, such as ANSI/AGMA 2002 and DIN3967, provide reference values of minimum backlash to be used in the gear design. However, increased customers' expectations in vehicle noise eduction have pushed backlash and allowable manufacturing tolerances to even lower limits. This is especially true in the truck market, where engines are quieter because they run at lower speeds to improve fuel economy, but they quite often run at high torsional vibration levels. Furthermore, gear and shaft arrangements in truck transmissions have become more complex due to increased number of speeds and to improve efficiency. Determining the minimum amount of backlash is quite a challenge. This paper presents an investigation of minimum backlash values of helical gear teeth applied to a light-duty pickup truck transmission. An analytical model was developed to calculate backlash limits of each gear pair when not transmitting load, and thus susceptible to generate rattle noise, through different transmission power paths. A statistical approach (Monte Carlo) was used since a significant number of factors affect backlash, such as tooth thickness variation; center distance variation; lead; runout and pitch variations; bearing clearances; spline clearances; and shaft deflections and misalignments. Analytical results identified the critical gear pair, and power path, which was confirmed experimentally on a transmission. The approach presented in this paper can be useful to design gear pairs with a minimum amount of backlash, to prevent double flank contact and to help reduce rattle noise to lowest levels.

98 Heavy-Duty Demands - Modern Coating Technology Examined (May 2013)

The hob is a perfect example of how a little manufacturing ingenuity can make a reliable, highly productive cutting tool. It's an engineering specimen that creates higher cutting speeds, better wear resistance and increases rigidity. The cutting tool alone, however, can't take all the credit for its resourcefulness. Advanced coating technology from companies like Sulzer, Oerlikon Balzers, Ionbond, Seco Tools and Cemecon helps improve cutting tools by reducing overall costs, increasing tool life and maintaining the highest levels of productivity. The following is a quick recap of new technologies and the latest information in the coating market.

99 Noise Reduction in an EV Hub Drive Using a Full Test and Simulation Methodology (May 2016)

With the ongoing push towards electric vehicles (EVs), there is likely to be increasing focus on the noise impact of the gearing required for the transmission of power from the (high-speed) electric motor to the road. Understanding automotive noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) and methodologies for total in-vehicle noise presupposes relatively large, internal combustion (IC) contributions, compared to gear noise. Further, it may be advantageous to run the electric motors at significantly higher rotational speed than conventional automotive IC engines, sending geartrains into yet higher speed ranges. Thus the move to EV or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) places greater or different demands on geartrain noise. This work combines both a traditional NVH approach (in-vehicle and rig noise, waterfall plots, Campbell diagrams and Fourier analysis) - with highly detailed transmission error measurement and simulation of the complete drivetrain - to fully understand noise sources within an EV hub drive. A detailed methodology is presented, combining both a full series of tests and advanced simulation to troubleshoot and optimize an EV hub drive for noise reduction.

100 Adding Up Gear Spheres (March/April 2016)

Paul Nylander is something between an entrepreneur and a Renaissance man. He has degrees in engineering and physics, but he's also a creative artist who's put together sketches and 3D renderings alike. His website, bugman123. com, features everything from an in-depth explanation of a Tesla coil to 3D renderings of physics equations to an extensive library of fractal-based artwork. At first glance, one might find Nylander's many pursuits to be somewhat scattershot, but at their core, his works are tied together by his love for all things mathematical.

101 Premature Gear Failure (January/February 2016)

I would appreciate if you could assist with a gear failure (occurring) after just seven weeks in service, post installation. This driving gear wheel has been installed in a medium-speed engine with backlash present at four different positions; with additional backlash checked on the mating surfaces. All backlash was found within (OEM)-recommended values. Please note included photos - it seems that the crack has started at the root fillet. Any comments would be appreciated.

102 Development of Usable Bevel Gearset with Length and Profile Crowning (November/December 2015)

In the previous sections, the development of conjugate bevel gearsets via hand calculations was demonstrated. The goal of this exercise was to encourage the reader to gain a basic understanding of the theory of bevel gears. This knowledge will help gear engineers to better judge bevel gear design and their manufacturing methods. In order to make the basis of this learning experience even more realistic, this chapter will convert a conjugate bevel gearset into a gearset that is suitable in a real-world application. Length and profile crowning will be applied to the conjugate flank surfaces. Just as in the previous chapter, all computations are demonstrated as manual hand calculations. This also shows that bevel gear theory is not as complicated as commonly assumed.

103 Gear Noise Prediction in Automotive Transmissions (August 2015)

Due to increasing requirements regarding the vibrational behavior of automotive transmissions, it is necessary to develop reliable methods for noise evaluation and design optimization. Continuous research led to the development of an elaborate method for gear noise evaluation. The presented methodology enables the gear engineer to optimize the microgeometry with respect to robust manufacturing.

104 New Transmissions Make the Gas GREENER (July 2015)

“Highway vehicles release about 1.7 billion tons of greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere each year — mostly in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2) — contributing to global climate change. The CO2 emissions of a car are directly proportional to the quantity of fuel consumed by an engine. In 2013, U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from transportation were second only to the electricity sector — an increase of about 16% since 1990.” (EPA.GOV).

105 Who Is Afraid of Innovation (September/October 2014)

There are varying opinions as to what constitutes innovation, but in our industry and in the engineering world as a whole, we typically think of innovation as being the use of technologies different from those we use at the moment to do things better, faster and cheaper.

106 Getting the Right Tools (September/October 2014)

So there is little chance that they need the same software to assist with their work. Gone are the days when companies wrote their own code and process engineers thumbed the same tattered reference book.

107 18 Things You Should Know About SPC for Gears (November/December 1996)

Statistical Precess Control (SPC) and statistical methods in general are useful techniques for identifying and solving complex gear manufacturing consistency and performance problems. Complex problems are those that exist in spite of our best efforts and the application of state-of-the-art engineering knowledge.

108 Chamfering and Deburring External Parallel Axis Gears (November/December 1996)

The chamfering and deburring operations on gear teeth have become more important as the automation of gear manufacturing lines in the automotive industry have steadily increased. Quieter gears require more accurate chamfers. This operation also translates into significant coast savings by avoiding costly rework operations. This article discusses the different types of chamfers on gear teeth and outlines manufacturing methods and guidelines to determine chamfer sizes and angles for the product and process engineer.

109 Gear Software You Didn't Know About (January/February 1997)

Designing and manufacturing gears requires the skills of a mathematician, the knowledge of an engineer and the experience of a precision machinist. For good measure, you might even include the are of a magician, because the formulas and calculations involved in gear manufacturing are so obscure and the processes so little known that only members of an elite cadre of professionals can perform them.

110 Wear Protection for Gears (March/April 1996)

Several trends in mechanical engineering are leading to greater surface stress on components and thus to unacceptable wear. These trends include greater stresses due to increased power densities; the need to maintain high precision of components throughout their service life; and the environmental imperative to reduce use of lubricants and additives.

111 Global Positioning System: The Early Years (January/February 2010)

Before retiring from St. Louis Gear in 2000, Roy Harmon liked to tinker. Since the customer base at the time was seasonal, Harmon was looking for a project to keep himself busy. The engineer decided to challenge himself by designing a “South Pointing Chariot,” a device he had read about in the book The Evolution of the Gear Art by Darle Dudley.

112 Candy Gears - Where Mesh Meets Marshmallow (August 2009)

On the production floor at Knechtel, food scientists, chemists and engineers take part in Willy Wonka-like experiments in search of the perfect piece of candy.

113 Industry Forum (May/June 1985)

This letter is in response to your article asking the readers where their interests lie. The division of Rockwell International where I work has engineering departments in Cicero.

114 Crowning: A Cheap Fix for Noise Reduction and Misalignment Problems and Applications (March/April 1987)

Noisy gear trains have been a common problem for gear designers for a long time. With the demands for smaller gear boxes transmitting more power at higher rpms and incumbent demands for greater efficiency, gear engineers are always searching for new ways to reduce vibration and limit noise without increasing costs.

115 Long on High Technology -- Short on High Technologists (September/October 1986)

At the present time, technology seems to be moving faster than our ability to educate people in its utilization. this is particularly true of the manufacturing engineering profession.

116 Advantages of Titanium Nitride Coated Gear Tools (May/June 1984)

A brief introduction to the subject of Thin Film Coatings and their application to gear hobs and shaper cutters is followed by a detailed description of the Chemical Vapor Deposition Process and the Physical Vapor Deposition Process. Advantages and disadvantages of each of these processes is discussed. Emphasis is placed upon: application engineering of coated gear tools based on laboratory and field test results. Recommendations are suggested for tool design improvements and optimization of gear cutting operations using coated tools. Productivity improvements potentially available by properly utilizing coated tools are considered in terms of both tool cost and machining cost.

117 IPTEX 2012 Preview (November/December 2011)

India is rapidly turning into a global manufacturing hub, thanks to the country’s manufacturing and engineering capabilities, vast pool of skilled expertise and its size. These qualities offer it a strategic advantage for the manufacturing segment. A large number of international companies in varied segments have already set up a manufacturing base in India and others are following suit. It only makes sense to bring this industry segment together under one roof to discuss the current trends and technology prevalent to the marketplace. IPTEX 2012 is scheduled from February 9–11, 2012 at the Bombay Exhibition Center in Mumbai, India.

118 Brick by Brick (September 2011)

Lego inspires the next generation of engineers, manufacturers and scientists.

119 PM Design Winners Announced at Powdermet 2011 (June/July 2011)

Design innovation, superior engineering properties, high end-market visibility and sustainability distinguish the winners of the 2011 Design Excellence awards, the annual powder metallurgy (PM) design competition sponsored by the Metal Powder Industries Federation.

120 Get Your Geek on at Edmund Scientific (July 2010)

A treasure trove of gear and power components for aspiring engineers and dedicated hobbyists.

121 American Manufacturing - Can It Be Saved (November/December 2009)

If anyone should ever need convincing that the state of American manufacturing is in ongoing decline, consider this: the state of Michigan has the highest concentration of engineers in the country, yet also has the highest unemployment rate. But there are ripples of hope out there as grassroots and otherwise organized groups are fighting the good fight in an attempt to reverse that trend.

122 NASA Gets Down and Dirty for SARJ Solution (September/October 2008)

For more than 10 months, NASA ground engineers and International Space Station (ISS) astronauts have been struggling with a perplexing malfunction of one of the station’s two solar array rotary joints (SARJ).

123 Crowned Spur Gears: Optimal Geometry and Generation (September/October 1988)

Involute spur gears are very sensitive to gear misalignment. Misalignment will cause the shift of the bearing contact toward the edge of the gear tooth surfaces and transmission errors that increase gear noise. Many efforts have been made to improve the bearing contact of misaligned spur gears by crowning the pinion tooth surface. Wildhaber(1) had proposed various methods of crowning that can be achieved in the process of gear generation. Maag engineers have used crowning for making longitudinal corrections (Fig. 1a); modifying involute tooth profile uniformly across the face width (Fig. 1b); combining these two functions in Fig. 1c and performing topological modification (Fig. 1d) that can provide any deviation of the crowned tooth surface from a regular involute surface. (2)

124 Basic Gear Noise Short Course Covers Fundamentals (August 2008)

More than 1,350 engineers and technicians have attended the basic course at Ohio State's GearLab.

125 Gearbox Speed Reducer Helps Fan Technology for "Greener" Jet Fuel Efficiency (August 2008)

Today’s ever-evolving global economic engine is, in many ways, a wonderful phenomenon; you know—a rising-tide-lifting-all-boats, trickle-down-theory-of-economics dynamic at work.

126 A Lean Strategy for Job Shops (November/December 2005)

POLCA: An alternative to Kanban for high-variety or custom-engineered products.

127 What to Know About Bevel Gear Grinding (September/October 2005)

Guidelines are insurance against mistakes in the often detailed work of gear manufacturing. Gear engineers, after all, can't know all the steps for all the processes used in their factories.

128 Marine Gears: Special Aspects for High Performance (May/June 2006)

A gearbox that absorbs 30 percent of external forces, transmits power from two engines operating at different speeds, and uses gears that meet several design and specification standards at the same time...

129 Constant Innovation Keeps Suppliers to Race Car Manufacturers Earning Trophies (May/June 2006)

When the fans start screaming at the Daytona 500, they're cheering for Jeff Gordon. Only the die-hard racing fan can appreciate the gearing and engineering that goes into each race car.

130 Detailed Computer Model of Gearbox Reduces Design Time (March/April 2006)

LMS International helped a Fiat subsidiary develop a new, dynamic vibro-acoustic prediction method to reduce design time and engineering costs through accurate prediction of gear noise in the design phase.

131 Wicked Gears (January/February 2006)

It's not often that thespians and engineers find common ground, but the hit musical Wicked could provide conversational tidbits for right- and left-brainers alike.

132 Optimization through Customization (July 2009)

Many engineers and purchasing agents think it is more expensive to custom design a component or assembly these days when often customization can save on total costs.

133 High Performance Gears Using Powder Metallurgy (PM) Technology (November/December 2004)

Powder metallurgy (P/M) techniques have proven successful in displacing many components within the automobile drive train, such as: connecting rods, carriers, main bearing caps, etc. The reason for P/M’s success is its ability to offer the design engineer the required mechanical properties with reduced component cost.

134 Hard Gear Finishing (March/April 1988)

Hard Gear Finishing (HGF), a relatively new technology, represents an advance in gear process engineering. The use of Computer Numerical Controlled (CNC) equipment ensures a high precision synchronous relationship between the tool spindle and the work spindle as well as other motions, thereby eliminating the need for gear trains. A hard gear finishing machine eliminates problems encountered in two conventional methods - gear shaving, which cannot completely correct gear errors in gear teeth, and gear rolling, which lacks the ability to remove stock and also drives the workpiece without a geared relationship to the master rolling gear. Such a machine provides greater accuracy, reducing the need for conventional gear crowning, which results in gears of greater face width than necessary.

135 Contact Surface Topology of Worm Gear Teeth (March/April 1988)

Among the various types of gearing systems available to the gear application engineer is the versatile and unique worm and worm gear set. In the simpler form of a cylindrical worm meshing at 90 degree axis angle with an enveloping worm gear, it is widely used and has become a traditional form of gearing. (See Fig. 1) This is evidenced by the large number of gear shops specializing in or supplying such gear sets in unassembled form or as complete gear boxes. Special designs as well as standardized ratio sets covering wide ratio ranges and center distanced are available with many as stock catalog products.

136 An Innovative Way of Designing Gear Hobbing Processes (May 2012)

In today’s manufacturing environment, shorter and more efficient product development has become the norm. It is therefore important to consider every detail of the development process, with a particular emphasis on design. For green machining of gears, the most productive and important process is hobbing. In order to analyze process design for this paper, a manufacturing simulation was developed capable of calculating chip geometries and process forces based on different models. As an important tool for manufacturing technology engineers, an economic feasibility analysis is implemented as well. The aim of this paper is to show how an efficient process design—as well as an efficient process—can be designed.

137 Introduction to Worm Gearing (March/April 1993)

Worm gears are among the oldest types of gearing, but that does not mean they are obsolete, antiquated technology. The main reasons for the bad experiences some engineers have with worm gearing are misapplication and misuse. No form of gearing works for every application. Strengths and weaknesses versus the application must be weighed to decide which form of gearing to use. For proper application and operation of worm gears, certain areas that may differ from other types of gearing need to be addressed.

138 No Time Like The Present (January/February 1996)

There's nothing like a new year - with the possible exception of birthdays ending in zero - to remind one of the passage of time. Keeping track of time has always been part of the brief of the gear engineer. One of the earliest gear assemblies is the remains of the Antikythera machine, a calendar/calculator dating from the first century B.C. Until the industrial revolution, clock makers and gear designers were usually the same people.

139 A Huge Success (September/October 1995)

Sivyer Steel Corporation, Bettendorf, IA, an ISO-9002-certified casting specialist, is familiar with tackling tough jobs. The company has built an international reputation as a supplier of high-integrity castings, especially those which require engineering and/or full machining. Its not unusual for Sivyer's customers, especially those in the mining, recycling, power generation, valve and nuclear fields, to ask the foundry to produce a one-of-a-kind casting - often something revolutionary - but AnClyde Engineered Products' request was a special challenge, even for Sivyer.

140 The Beginner's Guide to Powder Metal Gears (September/October 1995)

Increasingly gear designers and product engineers are capitalizing on the economic advantages of powder metallurgy (P/M) for new and existing gear applications. Powder metal gears are found in automobiles, outdoor power equipment transmissions and office machinery applications as well as power hand tools, appliances and medial components.

141 Drivetrain Research An Idea Whose Time is Overdue (July/August 1995)

The popular perception today is that technological advancement is an engine running almost out of control. New products and processes are developing faster than we can keep up with them, as anyone who has had a new computer system crash into obsolescence practically before it's out of the box can tell you. But that's not the case everywhere. Transmission technology, for example.

142 The Shape of Things to Come (July/August 1995)

An engineer's responsibility for verifying a new design or product concept as manufacturable early in the development cycle is a tough challenge. What appears to work on a blueprint or in a three-dimensional CAD file on a computer screen many not work on the factory floor; and the downstream impact on the manufacturing process of an undetected design flaw can be enormous. Costs can run into the millions.

143 Marketplace by the Lake (November/December 1994)

McCormick Place, Chicago. A manufacturer's dream. Acres and acres of machine tools up and running - cutting chips, filling molds, moving material, bending, shaping, smoothing, measuring. Computers, robots and lasers everywhere - George Lucas goes to engineering school. Sounds, light and, most important, over 100,000 people, moving around, taking notes, asking questions and, above all, buying. This was IMTS '94. A heady, if tiring, experience.

144 Contact Analysis of Gears Using a Combined Finite Element and Surface Integral Method (July/August 1993)

The complete and accurate solution t the contact problem of three-dimensional gears has been, for the past several decades, one of the more sought after, albeit elusive goals in the engineering community. Even the arrival on the scene in the mid-seventies of finite element techniques failed to produce the solution to any but the most simple gear contact problems.

145 CNC Bevel Gear Generators and Flared Cup Gear Grinding (July/August 1993)

New freedom of motion available with CNC generators make possible improving tooth contact on bevel and hypoid gears. Mechanical machines by their nature are inflexible and require a special mechanism for every desired motion. These mechanisms are generally exotic and expensive. As a result, it was not until the introduction of CNC generators that engineers started exploring motion possibilities and their effect on tooth contact.

146 Systematic Approach to Designing Plastic Spur and Helical Gears (November/December 1989)

Plastic gears are being used increasingly in applications, such as printers, cameras, small household appliances, small power tools, instruments, timers, counters and various other products. Because of the many variables involved, an engineer who designs gear trains on an occasional basis may find the design process to be somewhat overwhelming. This article outlines a systematic design approach for developing injection molded plastic spur and helical gears. The use of a computer program for designing plastic gears is introduced as an invaluable design tool for solving complex gearing equations.

147 Software Bits (January/February 2004)

The latest software for gear design, engineering and manufacturing.

148 Relationship between Misalignment and Transmission Error in Cross- Axes Helical Gear Assemblies (March/April 2019)

Question: I am a gear engineer for a motor manufacturer in China. I am writing about noise generated from cross-helical gear assembly error. I want to learn the relationship between the misalignment (center distance change and cross-angle shift) and transmission error. It is better under the loading and theory conditions. What is the trend of cross-helical gear development (use ZI worm and involute helical gear, point contact)?

149 SPC Acceptance of Hobbing & Shaping Machines (September/October 1991)

Today, as part of filling a typical gear hobbing or shaping machine order, engineers are required to perform an SPC acceptance test. This SPC test, while it is contractually necessary for machine acceptance, is not a machine acceptance test. It is a process capability test. It is an acceptance of the machine, cutting tool, workholding fixture, and workpiece as integrated on the cutting machine, using a gear measuring machine, with its work arbor and evaluation software, to measure the acceptance elements of the workpiece.

150 Basic Gear Generation Designing the Teeth (September/October 1991)

The finished gear engineer, the man who is prepared for all emergencies, must first of all know the basic design principles. Next he must be well versed in all sorts of calculations which come under the heading of "involute trigonometry."

151 Doing It Right & Faster... The Computer's Impact on Gear Design & Manufacture (May/June 1992)

The availability of technical software has grown rapidly in the last few years because of the proliferation of personal computers. It is rare to find an organization doing technical work that does not have some type of computer. For gear designers and manufacturers, proper use of the computer can mean the difference between meeting the competition or falling behind in today's business world. The right answers the first time are essential if cost-effective design and fabrication are to be realized. The computer is capable of optimizing a design by methods that are too laborious to undertake using hard calculations. As speeds continue to climb and more power per pound is required from gear systems, it no longer is possible to design "on the safe side" by using larger service factors. At high rotational speeds a larger gear set may well have less capacity because of dynamic effects. The gear engineer of today must consider the entire gear box or even the entire rotating system as his or her domain.

152 To Market, To Market (November/December 1991)

A few months ago at the AGMA management seminar, I was surprised by the feverish note taking that went on at a presentation on marketing. The sight reminded me that while many of us in the gear industry are good engineers, designers, and mangers, we are often not as familiar - or comfortable - with less concrete concepts, such as marketing.

153 Finding Gear Teeth Ratios (November/December 1985)

When designing gears, the engineer is often faced with the problem of selecting the number of teeth in each gear, so that the gear train will provide a given speed ratio

154 Philly Gear: A Long Life, A New Direction (January/February 2004)

Large marine gearboxes. More than a year in production, each weighing 125,000 pounds, the gearboxes were for U.S. Navy amphibious ships, for combining the power of 10,000 hp diesel engines to drive propeller shafts. They were also the last major gear products shipped from Philadelphia Gear Corp.’s King of Prussia factory.

155 Involute Splines (September/October 1990)

Engineering design requires many different types of gears and splines. Although these components are rather expensive, subject to direct wear, and difficult to replace, transmissions with gears and splines are required for two very simple reasons: 1) Motors have an unfavorable (disadvantageous) relation of torque to number of revolutions. 2)Power is usually required to be transmitted along a shaft.

156 Rebuilding a Metrology Infrastructure (January/February 1996)

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) announced at Gear Expo '95 that a national service for the calibration of involute artifacts is now available at the Department of Energy's Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN.

157 Moving Into High Gear (March/April 2007)

In February (2007), we launched a new magazine, Power Transmission Engineering (PTE). While most of you have probably already seen it...

158 Program for Involute Equation to Develop Spur Gears on Pro-E Software (May/June 2002)

In effect, this article continues a previous Gear Technology article, "Modeling Gears In Pro/Engineer," published in the January/February 1999 issue. The previous article discussed drawing involute gear teeth using a program built into the Pro/E software.

159 The Case of This Issue's Column (September/October 1995)

221B Baker Street We've always said that gears show up in all the best places, even, it turns out, among the papers of that most famous of detectives, Sherlock Holmes. "The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb" is, according to Dr. Watson, a case "so strange in its inception and so dramatic in its details," that it merits a mention even in our exalted pages.

160 1992 Marks Important Gear Design Milestone: Lewis Bending Strenth Equations Now 100 Years old (November/December 1992)

Columbus' first voyage to the Americas is not the only anniversary worthy of celebration this year. In 1892, on October 15, Wilfred Lewis gave an address to the Engineer's Club of Philadelphia, whose significance, while not as great as that of Columbus' voyage, had important results for the gearing community. In this address, Lewis first publicly outlined his formula for computing bending stress in gear teeth, a formula still in use today.

161 One Small Step Towards Mars (July 2014)

In the June issue of our sister publication -- Power Transmission Engineering -- the Power Play feature (Destination Mars! -- pg. 64) was devoted to NASA’s Mars-oriented LDSD (Low Density Supersonic Decelerator) project...

162 Corus New Gear Steels Reduce Alloys Without Sacrificing Achievable Hardness (September/October 2005)

Corus Engineering Steels' formula for its new gear steels: Maintain achievable hardness while using fewer alloys, thereby cutting steel costs for gear manufacturers.

163 The AGS Gear Industry Training Series (May 2017)

An Introduct to Gear Process Engineering.

164 Creative Drive (January/February 1999)

Alexander Deeb Could Have Been A Gear Engineer. "I have always had a fascination with movement and moving parts," Deeb says. "As a boy at Christmas time, I was much more interested in how and why my new toys worked than in what they actually did. That curiosity has never left me."

165 Issues of Gear Design Using 3D Solid Modeling Systems (January/February 1999)

More and more gear shops are wrestling with the issue of whether or not solid modeling is right for their gear design work. The Q & A Page of The Gear Industry Home Page has had numerous questions asking how to model gears in solid modeling applications such as AutoCAD, Solidworks and Pr/Engineer. Given the problems people have been having, we are presenting the step-by-step process for modeling gears in Pr/Engineer, but first we thought it would be a good idea to explore the question of whether or not you should even try to design gears using Pro/Engineer or any other 3D solid modeling program.

166 Technical Calendar (January/February 1986)

The Society of Manufacturing Engineers is sponsoring an educational program on the "Fundamentals of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering," to be held January 28-30, 1986 at the Sheraton-Sand Key Resort in Clear-water Beach, Florida.

167 Cool Gears (May/June 1999)

It's nice to have claim to fame. "We're probably the world's foremost authority on making gears out of ice," says Jeff Root of Virtual Engineering, Plymouth, MI.

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8 Star SU Adds Engineering and Sales Staff (June 8, 2011)
Grady Knight has joined Star SU as a project engineer for the machine tool division. He will work closely on large projects with vice pre... Read News

9 Trevor Jones Promoted to Principal Engineer (June 7, 2011)
Trevor Jones has been promoted to principal engineer at Solar Atmospheres, Inc. Jones started with Solar as a part time employee in ... Read News

10 Hamilton Sundstrand Awarded Contract for Trent 1000 Engine (April 16, 2004)
The Rolls-Royce Co. selected Hamilton Sundstrand to design and manufacture the gearbox system for the Trent 1000 engine that is being dev... Read News

11 Hantke Named New President of Sales and Engineering at Schaeffler Industrial (July 13, 2015)
Stefan Hantke recently assumed global management of sales and engineering of the industrial division of Schaeffler Technologies AG &... Read News

12 Lenze-AC Tech Names Director of Engineering (April 30, 2008)
Jim Craig joins AC Technology, a member of the Lenze Group, as the new director of engineering. He will direct the design of all new pr... Read News

13 Bernstein Joins Romax Engineering Staff (February 13, 2008)
Romax Technology recently announced that Charles Bernstein has joined its engineering department. Bernstein has over 40 years of experien... Read News

14 Wheelabrator Hires New Service Engineer (August 13, 2007)
 Juan Jose Limón recently joined Wheelabrator Group as sales/service engineer in Mexico. In this position, Limón will ... Read News

15 AGMA Seeks Staff Engineer (February 12, 2007)
The American Gear Manufacturers Association is seeking a staff engineer responsible for coordinating technical committees in the developm... Read News

16 Ikona Announces Marketing Agreement with Bronte Engineering (April 25, 2006)
Ikona Gear International announced signing a letter of intent with Bronte Engineering Technologies Ltd., a U.K.-based engineering and man... Read News

17 Minnick Appointed as VP of Engineering at Inductoheat (March 16, 2005)
Randy Minnick was named vice president of engineering at Inductoheat Inc. According to the company's press release, he has been in... Read News

18 Rush Gear Announces Reverse Engineering Capability (February 6, 2005)
Rush Gears Inc., of Fort Washington, PA, announced their capability to reverse engineer both drawings and sample parts. According to ... Read News

19 GMTA Hires Manger of Controls Engineering and Programming (October 11, 2013)
Effective October 1, Maik Schminke was named manager of controls engineering and programming at the Ann Arbor facility of GMTA. According... Read News

20 Polygon Solutions Participates in Engineering Initiative for Girls (February 18, 2013)
On February 21, 2013, women engineers, along with their male counterparts, will engage and mentor as many as one million girls around the... Read News

21 Romax InSight Supports Eurus Energy America with the Biggest Gearbox Re-Engineering and Refurbishment Project (September 10, 2015)
Romax Technology recently announced that it will be supporting Eurus Energy America (EEA) with its largest ever gearbox re-engineering an... Read News

22 Engineering Student Finds Leadership Opportunities at College of DuPage (May 18, 2018)
COD student Josie Suter has gained industry experience and leadership opportunities through the engineering program at College of DuPag... Read News

23 Kitagawa NorthTech Productivity Team Designs Custom Engineered Workholding Services (March 15, 2017)
Kitagawa NorthTech, Inc. provides turnkey and custom engineered workholding services. Known for their standard and advanced chucks, the c... Read News

24 LMI Aerospace Appoints Jay Inman President of Engineering Services, Keith Schrader Vice President of Operations (January 20, 2017)
LMI Aerospace Inc. has appointed Jay Inman as president of engineering services, a role he had been serving on an interim basis since Sep... Read News

25 MTB Welcomes Applications Engineering Manager (December 29, 2015)
Machine Tool Builders, Inc. recently announced that Yefim Kotlyar has joined as the application engineering manager. Kotlyar comes to MTB... Read News

26 KISSsoft USA Hires Engineering Manager (March 8, 2016)
KISSsoft USA, LLC recently announced that Ty Warner has joined the company as engineering manager. Warner is a licensed professional engi... Read News

27 Forest City Gear Welcomes Process Engineer (September 5, 2017)
Forest City Gear has added Brian Gustafson to its growing team of process engineers, with responsibility for creating the routings, machi... Read News

28 Kitagawa-NorthTech Names Ed Johannesen Senior Manager of Engineering and Quality (December 2, 2016)
Kitagawa-NorthTech, Inc. has named Ed Johannesen as Senior Manager of Engineering and Quality. Johannesen will lead the design engineerin... Read News

29 ZF Recruits 250 Engineers (June 15, 2007)
With the objective of launching a hybrid drive system on the market within the next few years, ZF is concentrating on orders for the Germ... Read News

30 REM Surface Engineering Opens Upgraded Texas Facility (September 25, 2017)
REM Surface Engineering announced the grand reopening of their newly remodeled facility in Brenham, Texas. They have put the finishing to... Read News

31 Romax Technology Signs Preferred Engineering Partnership with Applied Technologies (July 25, 2007)
 101 West Big Beaver Rd ¨ Troy, Michigan 48084             &nbs... Read News

32 Seco Tools Announces Component Engineered Tooling Partnership (June 27, 2007)
Seco Tools Inc. announces Component Engineered Tooling (CET), the newest offering from its Seco Business Solutions service provisions mad... Read News

33 BIG Kaiser Program Addresses Local Engineer Shortage (June 26, 2007)
For years, BIG Kaiser Precision Tooling Inc. announced continuation of its partnership with Elk Grove High School to support st... Read News

34 Wheelabrator’s Airblast Peening Technology Credited with Start-Up of Two Custom Machines for Turbine Engine Components (February 27, 2007)
The Wheelabrator technology for automated airblast peening equipment is credited with the recent start-up of two custom machines at a rep... Read News

35 Source Engineering Introduces Planetary Gearmotors for OEM Applications (May 31, 2007)
Source Engineering introduced planetary brush and brushless gearmotors for OEM applications. Gearmotors are best suited to applications r... Read News

36 Source Engineering Introduces Planetary Gearmotors for OEM Applications (May 24, 2007)
Source Engineering introduced planetary brush and brushless gearmotors for OEM applications. Gearmotors are best suited to applications r... Read News

37 Napoleon Engineering Services Announces Rolling-Contact Fatigue and Wear Testing (October 10, 2017)
The largest independent bearing testing and inspection facility in the United States, Napoleon Engineering Services (NES) has announced t... Read News

38 Paccar Announces Plans for $400 Million Engine Manufacturing Plant (January 16, 2007)
Paccar Inc. Inc unveiled plans for a new $400 million powertrain manufacturing and assembly facility in the southeast United States. ... Read News

39 Holroyd Precision Apprentice Receives Advanced Engineering Apprentice of the Year Award from Rochdale Training (April 4, 2018)
Rochdale-based Holroyd Precision Rotors had cause to celebrate when one of its apprentices secured a top honor at Rochdale Training's... Read News

40 Engineered Tools Opens Gear Cutting Systems Division (April 15, 2006)
Engineered Tools Corp. of Caro, MI, has introduced its new gear cutting system division. Cutter body repair will take place at ETC... Read News

41 Lin Engineering Introduces New Motors (April 13, 2005)
Lin Engineering Inc. has introduced a new line of IP65-rated motors. These motors are available in size 17 and 23 and offer protection a... Read News

42 GWJ Technology Releases Latest Version of GearEngineer Software (September 27, 2018)
GearEngineer is a software program designed for calculating the real 3D tooth form in addition to the dimensioning and load capacity of... Read News

43 Sunnen's SV-310 Bore Sizing System Designed for Small Engines, Compressors (August 21, 2007)
Sunnen's new SV-310 vertical CNC honing system combines a choice of tooling options, large work envelope, and 762mm/30" str... Read News

44 Seco Tools Promotes Thomas Funke to Component Engineered Tooling Manager (April 4, 2017)
Seco Tools, LLC recently promoted Thomas Funke to Component Engineered Tooling (CET) Manager to drive the expansion and enhancement of th... Read News

45 REM Surface Engineering Appoints Justin Michaud as CEO (May 12, 2017)
REM Surface Engineering has announced the appointment of Justin Michaud as CEO. He assumed responsibilities on January 1, 2017 and will s... Read News

46 Mahr Federal MarSolutions Engineered Metrology Team Assists Customers in Choosing Gaging Solutions (April 7, 2016)
Mahr Federal has established a special team within its Engineered Products Division to augment custom gage development directly with cust... Read News

47 Star SU Appoints Rydberg Gear Tool Technology Engineer (December 23, 2015)
Star SU has appointed Dave Rydberg as Gear Tool Technology Engineer for its Cutting Tool division. In his new role, Rydberg will join the... Read News

48 Hewland Engineering Expands Grinding Capabilities (May 13, 2015)
Hewland Engineering recently announced a multi-million pound investment in state-of-the-art spiral bevel grinding capability, due to arri... Read News

49 John Oller Named Engineering Manager at Rj Link (October 16, 2014)
Rj Link International Inc. is pleased to announce that John Oller has been named as Engineering Manager. Oller will be responsible for en... Read News

50 Renishaw Acquires Advanced Consulting and Engineering (April 17, 2014)
Renishaw has purchased the business of Advanced Consulting & Engineering, Inc. (ACE), a U.S.-based supplier of dimensional measurement products and services focused on the automotive industry... Read News

51 Lubrication Engineers Introduce Monocal GP Grease (February 26, 2014)
Lubrication Engineers, Inc. recently introduced Monocal GP Grease (1499), a versatile general purpose lubricant for use in severe conditi... Read News

52 PTG Engineer Secures 2014 AMTRI Scholarship (February 18, 2014)
The Manufacturing Technologies Association (MTA) awards dinner, held at Birmingham’s International Convention Centre on February 6,... Read News

53 Hainbuch America Announces Jim McCraw as Applications Engineer (November 8, 2016)
Hainbuch America has announced that Jim McCraw has joined their team as an Applications Engineer supporting their growing number of Regio... Read News

54 Kitagawa NorthTech Hires Shaun Thomas as Senior Manager of Engineering & Manufacturing (May 8, 2017)
Kitagawa NorthTech, Inc. announced that Shaun Thomas has joined the company as Senior Manager of Engineering & Manufacturing. In his ... Read News

55 Clarke Engineering Celebrates 62nd Anniversary (December 23, 2016)
This year marks the 62nd year that Clarke Engineering, Inc. has been providing precision gears to the aerospace industry. The management ... Read News

56 Sunnen Releases Engine Rebuilding Catalog (March 23, 2012)
The new 128-page "Engine Rebuilding Equipment" catalog from Sunnen Products includes Sunnen tooling, abrasives and accessories ... Read News

57 GWJ Updates GearEngineer Software (January 20, 2012)
GWJ Technology GmbH, headquartered in Braunschweig, Germany, recently introduced a new version of its GearEngineer software. The version ... Read News

58 Riten Live Centers Engineered for Small Workpieces (June 27, 2011)
Riten Extra-Light live centers are designed specifically to turn or grind parts weighing as little as two ounces. These parts are commonl... Read News

59 Magnetic Chucks Engineered for Heavy Duty Holding Force (May 3, 2010)
SAV North America introduced a line of magnetic chucks that deliver heavy duty holding for accurately cutting parts. The Radial Pole High... Read News

60 Advanced Machine & Engineering Appoints Product Manager (March 9, 2010)
  Christian Schedler has been promoted to the position of product manager of the Speedcut Saw Technology Division of Advanced Machin... Read News

61 Mahr Acquires Engineering Synthesis Design Inc. (August 27, 2015)
The Mahr Group recently acquired Engineering Synthesis Design Inc. (ESDI), headquartered (Tucson, AZ). Over the past two years, Mahr... Read News

62 Dale Bridgewater Joins MTB as Shop, Service and Engineering Manager (March 14, 2019)
Machine Tool Builders, Inc. is pleased to announce that Dale Bridgewater has recently joined Machine Tool Builders, Inc. as the shop, ser... Read News