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1 Watch It - Revolutions (March/April 2019)

It's time to catch up on the episodes of Revolutions that you might have missed.

2 Introducing Revolutions (September/October 2018)

The new series of videos from Gear Technology TV brings you technology insight from leading experts in the gear industry.

3 We Hope You Enjoy(ed) the Show (September/October 2018)

IMTS 2018 was the biggest ever, no matter how you want to measure it. With 129,415 registrations, the show far surpassed the previous record of 121,764 set twenty years ago, in 1998. There were also more exhibiting companies (2,563) taking up more floor space (1,424,232 sq. ft.) than ever before.

4 Revolutions (May/June 2002)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

5 Revolutions (May/June 2001)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

6 Revolutions (July/August 2001)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

7 Revolutions (September/October 2001)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

8 Revolutions (November/December 2001)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

9 Revolutions (January/February 2002)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

10 Revolutions (March/April 2002)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

11 Revolutions (September/October 2002)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

12 Revolutions (July/August 2002)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

13 Revolutions (November/December 2002)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

14 Revolutions (January/February 2003)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

15 Revolutions (March/April 2003)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

16 Revolutions (May/June 2003)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

17 Revolutions (July/August 2003)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

18 Revolutions (September/October 2003)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

19 Revolutions (March/April 2001)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

20 Revolutions (January/February 2001)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

21 Revolutions (November/December 2000)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

22 Revolutions (September/October 2000)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

23 Revolutions (November/December 2003)

"Holding Gears in Place for Quick Operations" and "Machine Broaches Unusual Sized Gears."

24 Revolutions (January/February 2004)

"Magnetic Filtration" and "Better Blanking from Bar-Stock"

25 Revolutions (May/June 2004)

"Frenco--Inspecting All Flanks in Minutes."

26 Revolutions (March/April 2004)

"Gears of Gold" and "Process Equipment's Virtual ND430."

27 Revolutions (January/February 1999)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry. Revolutions welcomes your submissions.

28 Revolutions (March/April 1999)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

29 Revolutions (May/June 1999)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

30 Revolutions (July/August 1999)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

31 Revolutions (September/October 1999)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

32 Revolutions (November/December 1999)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

33 Revolutions (January/February 2000)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

34 Revolutions (March/April 2000)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

35 Revolutions (May/June 2000)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

36 Revolutions (July/August 2000)

Welcome to Revolutions, the column that brings you the latest, most up-to-date and easy-to-read information about the people and technology of the gear industry.

37 Involute Splines (September/October 1990)

Engineering design requires many different types of gears and splines. Although these components are rather expensive, subject to direct wear, and difficult to replace, transmissions with gears and splines are required for two very simple reasons: 1) Motors have an unfavorable (disadvantageous) relation of torque to number of revolutions. 2)Power is usually required to be transmitted along a shaft.

38 Hob Basics Part I (September/October 1993)

The Hobbing Process The hobbing process involves a hob which is threaded with a lead and is rotated in conjunction with the gear blank at a ratio dependent upon the number of teeth to be cut. A single thread hob cutting a 40-tooth gear will make 40 revolutions for each revolution of the gear. The cutting action in hobbing is continuous, and the teeth are formed in one passage of the hob through the blank. See Fig. 1 for a drawing of a typical hob with some common nomenclature.

39 Kish Method for Dermination of Hunting Mesh (May/June 1997)

When designing a gear set, engineers usually want the teeth of the gear (Ng) and the pinion (Np) in a "hunting" mesh. Such a mesh or combination is defined as one in which the pinion and the gear do not have any common divisor by a prime number. If a mesh is "hunting," then the pinion must make Np x Ng revolutions before the same pinion tooth meshes with the same gear space. It is often easy to determine if a mesh is hunting by first determining if both the pinion and the gear teeth are divisible by 2,3,5,7,etc. (prime numbers). However, in this age of computerization, how does one program the computer to check for hunting teeth? A simple algorithm is shown below.